Textiles

TEXTILE DESCRIPTIONS

 

                    

 

 

AFRICAN MUDCLOTH


Mud cloth, also known as Bògòlanfini is handwoven on a small looms then sewn together to make a larger piece of textile.   The larger piece is then printed using hand carved wood blocks and fermeted vegetable dyes mixed with fermented mud hence the name “mudcloth”.   The printed pattern is the fingerprint of the artisan rendering each one an extraordinary piece of art and have become the symbol of cultural identity. 

 

We carefully select and buy H|F mudcloths directly from the Dogon tribes of Mali through a travelling tribal Mamma.   Each textile is  cleaned, reinforced, and finally  finished with a water resistant natural color stay oil solution to ensure the best longevity of the finished piece.  Fading and softness will occur with age and the items “lived in feel” only brings more life to the indigenous pattern. 

 

 

 

 

BUIRKINA FASO

 

This textile is called “Thioup”  which is a bazin riche cotton from the sub-m Saharan African tribes of Burkina Faso.   Narrow 4” handwoven strips are stitched together to make single a cloth.  Repairs and hand stitching over the years make every single piece a work of art showing it’s graceful aging process.   

Signs of fading, color variation and hand repairs will be present in all of the vintage pieces.  We have cleaned, repaired, reinforced and stabilized this textile for it’s intended use.  Like all denim, this original version only gets better with age. 

 

 

 

 

VINTAGE AFRICAN INDIGO

 

This textile is called “Thioup”  which is a bazin riche cotton from the sub-m Saharan African tribes of the Mossi and Burkina Faso.   Narrow 4” handwoven strips are stitched together to make single a cloth, then dip dyed several times in indigofera [indigo] to obtain it’s rich color. The intricate pattern is made using stitches or compression to keep the color absent  from the dye.  It is often only worn for special occasions.  Repairs and hand stitching over the past 40-50 years make every single piece a work of art showing it’s graceful aging process.   

Signs of fading, color variation and hand repairs will be present in all of the vintage pieces.  We have cleaned, repaired, reinforced and stabilized this textile for it’s intended use.  Like all denim, this original version only gets better with age. 

 

 

 

HMONG BATIK

 

These glorious textile arts are traditionally practiced by the Hmong people in the mountain regions of Thailand.  Natural hemp fabrics are dyed in deep indo then are hand printed in a repetitive motion using hand carved wood blocks dipped in dye to create a consistent pattern.  Bold geometric designs are often realized in bright, contrasting colors.  The technique is passed on from generation to generation producing a glorious pattern that is unique to each tribe and artisan.

 

 

TURKISH KILIM 

 

The ancient craftsmanship of kilim is defined by flat tapestry woven carpets produced from the Balkans to Pakistan dating back to the fourth or fifth centuries.  Produced by tightly interweaving the warp  and weft strands of the weave, kilim is known for having a flat surface with no pile.  Recognized for their intense geometric patterns and vibrant colors these coveted rugs have been sought after by collectors and designers since the mid century. 

 

SHIBORI

One of the oldest Indigo dying techniques in Japan.  The process is a tedious series of binding, folding, stitching dying and repeating.    We approached this process using indigo denim and slowly removed the color from the textile over several days using natural "bleaching" agents and sunlight to pull out color without burning the textile.  Each method that is used is done in harmony with the cloth to create beautiful surface designs rendering every piece a unique on of a kind work of art.

 

 

 

 

 

VINTAGE MEXIcAN SALTILLO

 

The center cut of a Saltillo boasts the unique design that belongs to each piece.  You will only have one center cut making this the most valuable piece of the textile.  

The Mexican serape blanket is often noted for its striped or banded colorful design. The largest stripe is always the primary color and repeated throughout weave, along with complimentary colors.  The vibrancy of the blanket is created by dying each color strand separately before hand-looming to create striped color waves that seem to melt into each other.   The technique to make stunning blankets has been passed on through the generations and it is hard to find two serape blankets woven exactly the same.

 

 

 

MEXICAN SERAPE

 

 

The term sarape is for the rectangular woven blanket  The traditional serape as made in the Mexican state of Coahuila in north-eastern Mexico near the city of Saltillo often consists of a dark base color with bands of yellow, orange, red, blue, green, purple or other bright colors. The ends are usually fringed.

 

GUATEMALAN AGUAYO LINEN

 

The Maya Indians of Guatemala have handwoven their personal clothing and accessories for centuries.  These years of practice and passing on of weaving tradition has resulted in a wide array of textiles unequaled in quality, color and design. 

 

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